Council Calendar Forms Library

Youth Protection

New Juniata Valley Council, BSA Youth Protection Guidelines

The Juniata Valley Council and the Boy Scouts of America wants to insure EVERY Pack, Troop, Crew, and Post is the SAFEST place a young person can be. The following information summarizes the GUIDELINES that MUST be followed:

  1. All scouting activities must have a minimum of two adult leaders. The leader in charge must be at least 21 years of age and the assistant leader must be at least 18 years of age.
  2. Every adult working regularly with a unit should be registered with the Boy Scouts of America. All adults working with youth must have taken youth protection training.
  3. Youth are to be provided privacy from adults and adults privacy from youth when using the restroom, shower, or changing.
  4. A youth member may not share a tent with an adult unless it is a parent/child. When cabin camping privacy must be maintained for both youth and adults while changing and sleeping.
  5. Every new adult registering is to have AT LEAST three references. It is the responsibility of the Committee Chairman and Chartered Organization Representative to contact at least three references before submitting the application. (If at least three members of the current committee know the individual and will give a positive endorsement, this will meet the requirement.) All adult applications will have a background check completed at the council service center prior to final approval. All information is kept strictly confidential.
  6. Every registered adult in the unit will take the youth protection training program offered by district training teams or take the on-line youth protection training. This course is available through our web site. www.jvcbsa.org. These courses are offered to parents and the general public as well. Parents should take this training. Scouters that complete the on line training will have their records updated accordingly.
  7. Every Cub Scout Den is to annually show the video ?It Happened to Me? to parents and Cubs at a combined meeting. (Written notice to parents prior to this being viewed is important)
  8. Every Troop is to annually show the video ?A Time to Tell? to the Scouts at a regular Troop meeting and to invite parents to attend. (Written notice to parents prior to this being viewed is important)
  9. Every Venturing Crew is to show the video ?Youth Protection? annually to member and to all parents.
  10. Every Commissioner, District Committee Member, Council Scouter, and Unit Leaders must complete a Youth Protection Training course, view the video available at the Council Service Center or take the training on-line. This course is available through our web site. www.jvcbsa.org. Scouters that complete the on line training will have their records updated accordingly.
  11. An Assistant Scoutmaster, Assistant Cubmaster, or Assistant Crew Advisor should serve as the unit?s Youth Protection coordinator to insure all the above items are followed.
  12. Any incident or suspicions of child abuse must be reported to the Council Scout Executive, Jim Kennedy immediately. Council Service Center 717-667-9267.

Trips And Overnight Activities Male / Female Leadership Policy

No matter which program area you work in ? Cub Scouting, Boy Scouts, Venturing, or Exploring ? there will be occasions when the leadership in a BSA authorized trip or outing will be both male and female. Knowledge of and compliance with Youth Protection policies is important.

These are the guidelines to be followed when making overnight arrangements:

  • All leaders are expected to reflect high moral standards established by customs, traditional values, and religious teaching.
  • Male and female leaders are required to have separate sleeping facilities. Married couples may share the same quarters if appropriate facilities are available.
  • Male and female youth participants will not share the same sleeping facility. When staying in tents, no youth will stay in the tent of an adult other than his/her parent or guardian.
  • If housing other than tents is used, separate facilities must be provided for male and female participants.
    In camps where separate facilities are not available, times for male and female use should be scheduled and posted for showers. Use the buddy system for latrine use by having a person wait outside the entrance or use ?Occupied? and ?Unoccupied? signs or inside door latches.

 


National Council, BSA Youth Protection Information

The Boy Scouts of America places the greatest importance on creating the most secure environment possible for our youth members. To maintain such an environment, the BSA developed numerous procedural and leadership selection policies and provides parents and leaders the following online, video, and print resources for the Cub Scout, Boy Scout, and Venturing programs.

Leadership Selection

The Boy Scouts of America takes great pride in the quality of our adult leadership. Being a leader in the BSA is a privilege, not a right. The quality of the program and the safety of our youth members call for high-quality adult leaders. We work closely with our chartered organizations to help recruit the best possible leaders for their units.

The adult application requests background information that should be checked by the unit committee or the chartered organization before accepting an applicant for unit leadership. While no current screening techniques exist that can identify every potential child molester, we can reduce the risk of accepting a child molester by learning all we can about an applicant for a leadership position?his or her experience with children, why he or she wants to be a Scout leader, and what discipline techniques he or she would use.

The Boy Scouts of America takes great pride in the quality of our adult leadership. Being a leader in the BSA is a privilege, not a right. The quality of the program and the safety of our youth members call for high-quality adult leaders. Our chartered organizations endeavor to recruit the best possible leaders for their units.

The adult application requests background information that should be checked by the unit committee or the chartered organization before accepting an applicant f or unit leadership. While no current screening techniques exist that can identify every potential child molester, we can reduce the risk of accepting a child molester by learning all we can about an applicant for a leadership position?his or her experience with children, why he or she wants to be a Scout leader, and other matters.

Barriers to Abuse Within Scouting

The BSA has adopted the following policies to provide additional security for our members. These policies are primarily for the protection of our youth members; however, they also serve to protect our adult leaders from false accusations of abuse.

  • Two-deep leadership. Two registered adult leaders or one registered leader and a parent of a participant, or other adult, one of whom must be 21 years of age or older, are required on all trips and outings. The chartered organization is responsible for ensuring that sufficient leadership is provided for all activities.
  • No one-on-one contact. One-on-one contact between adults and youth members is not permitted. In situations that require personal conferences, such as a Scoutmaster's conference, the meeting is to be conducted in view of other adults and youths.
  • Respect of privacy. Adult leaders must respect the privacy of youth members in situations such as changing clothes and taking showers at camp, and intrude only to the extent that health and safety require. Adults must protect their own privacy in similar situations.
  • Separate accommodations. When camping, no youth is permitted to sleep in the tent of an adult other than his own parent or guardian. Councils are strongly encouraged to have separate shower and latrine facilities for females. When separate facilities are not available, separate times for male and female use should be scheduled and posted for showers.
  • Proper preparation for high-adventure activities. Activities with elements of risk should never be undertaken without proper preparation, equipment, clothing, supervision, and safety measures.
  • No secret organizations. The Boy Scouts of America does not recognize any secret organizations as part of its program. All aspects of the Scouting program are open to observation by parents and leaders.
  • Appropriate attire. Proper clothing for activities is required. For example, skinny-dipping is not appropriate as part of Scouting.
  • Constructive discipline. Discipline used in Scouting should be constructive and reflect Scouting's values. Corporal punishment is never permitted.
  • Hazing prohibited. Physical hazing and initiations are prohibited and may not be included as part of any Scouting activity.
  • Junior leader training and supervision. Adult leaders must monitor and guide the leadership techniques used by junior leaders and ensure that BSA policies are followed.
  • Member responsibilities. All members of the Boy Scouts of America are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the principles set forth in the Scout Oath and Law. Physical violence, hazing, bullying, theft, verbal insults, drugs, and alcohol have no place in the Scouting program and may result in the revocation of a Scout's membership in the unit.
  • Unit responsibilities. The head of the chartered organization or chartered organization representative and the local council must approve the registration of the unit's adult leader. Adult leaders of Scouting units are responsible for monitoring the behavior of youth members and interceding when necessary. Parents of youth members who misbehave should be informed and asked for assistance in dealing with it.

The "three R's" of Youth Protection

The "three R's" of Youth Protection convey a simple message to youth members:

  • Recognize situations that place you at risk of being molested, how child molesters operate, and that anyone could be a molester.
  • Resist unwanted and inappropriate attention. Resistance will stop most attempts at molestation.
  • Report attempted or actual molestation to a parent or other trusted adult. This prevents further abuse and helps to protect other children. Let the Scout know he or she will not be blamed for what occurred.

 For More Information and Youth Protection Specific Resources

Visit the National Council of the Boy Scouts of America Youth Protection Site here. 

 

If you have a question, comment or suggestions, please E-mail:  Jim Kennedy

Juniata Valley Council, BSA, 9 Taylor Drive, Reedsville PA 17084  (717) 667-9236(voice)  717-667-9798 (fax)